Episode 3: See That He Behaves

 George McQuillan's idealized portrait on his 1914 Cracker Jack baseball card is very different from his appearance in photographs (see below).

George McQuillan's idealized portrait on his 1914 Cracker Jack baseball card is very different from his appearance in photographs (see below).

George McQuillan was one of the most accomplished pitchers in baseball until a variety of scandals and personal problems brought his career crashing down. Part Dwight Gooden, part Max Scherzer, and part Christy Mathewson, McQuillan's fall from grace is one of baseball's saddest stories. This episode uses never-before-published documents to tell the story of how McQuillan lost his way, his attempt to resurrect his career from the ashes, and his part in the real-life story of an Oscar-winning film.

 George McQuillan warming up for a game on June 15, 1910, four days after returning to the Phillies from his suspension for alcoholism.

George McQuillan warming up for a game on June 15, 1910, four days after returning to the Phillies from his suspension for alcoholism.

 George McQuillan's 1910 baseball card accurately portrays his heterochromia.

George McQuillan's 1910 baseball card accurately portrays his heterochromia.

 By 1915, George McQuillan's appearance bore virtually no resemblance to the young man portrayed on the 1910 baseball card. He was probably 29 when this photo was taken.

By 1915, George McQuillan's appearance bore virtually no resemblance to the young man portrayed on the 1910 baseball card. He was probably 29 when this photo was taken.


BOX SCORE - EPISODE 2

BOOKS

Centennial History of Arkansas, Volume III. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1922.

Crook, Martin Andrew. Clinical Biochemistry and Metabolic Medicine, Eighth Edition. CRC Press, 2013.

ARTICLES

Ellingwood, Finley. Untitled. Ellington’s Therapeutist, Vol. 2, 1908.

Enders, Eric. “George McQuillan.” Published in Tom Simon, editor, Deadball Stars of the National League. Washington, DC: Brassey’s, 2004.

Frith, John. “Syphilis – Its Early History and Treatment Until Penicillin and the Debate on its Origins.” Journal of Military and Veterans’ Health, Volume 20, Number 4 (2012).

Goldman, Andrew. “Dwight Gooden was not best friends with Darryl Strawberry.” New York Times Magazine, May 31, 2013.

Gooden’s Timeline of Troubles.” Newsday, March 24, 2010. 

Harper, John. “With 30-year reunion of ‘86 Mets approaching, Doc Gooden opens up about dark past, ongoing struggle with addiction.” New York Daily News, May 16, 2016.

Hay, Eugene Carson, M.D. “The Advantages in the Treatment of Syphilis at the Hot Springs of Arkansas.” Journal of the American Medical Association, February 6, 1897, p. 251-253.

Kernan, Kevin. “Doc Gooden’s life of alcohol, drugs and Ks: ‘Never thought I’d make it to 50’.” New York Post, November 16, 2014. 

Kofoed, J.C. “A Real Big League Comeback.” Baseball Magazine, August 1914.

Mercurial Treatment in Syphilis.” Published in Monthly Cyclopaedia and Medical Bulletin, Volume 2. Charles Euchariste de Medici Sajous, John Madison Taylor, John Vietch Shoemaker, editors. F.A. Davis Company, 1909.

Neff, Craig. “Doctor K: Awesome and Then Some.” Sports Illustrated, September 2, 1985.

Saccoman, John. “Garry Herrmann.” Published online by the SABR Biography Project.

Secret drug shame of Mets star Doc Gooden.” New York Post, May 18, 2013. 

Swift, E.M. “So good, so young.” Sports Illustrated, April 15, 1985.

Taylor, R.W., M.D. “The Hot Springs of Arkansas and the Treatment of Syphilis.” Published in George F. Shrady, M.D., editor, Medical Record: A Weekly Journal of Medicine and Surgery, Volume 37. New York: William Wood & Company, 1890.

Verducci, Tom. “Doc’s Knockout Year.” Sports Illustrated, September 21, 2015.

Verducci, Tom. “The High Price of Hard Living.” Sports Illustrated, February 27, 1995.

NEWSPAPERS and MAGAZINES

Journal of the American Medical Association, August 28, 1909.

New York Times (various articles, 1915)

Pittsburgh Daily Post (various articles, 1915)

Sporting Life (various articles, 1907-1915)

ARCHIVAL DOCUMENTS

George McQuillan research file, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

Letter, Ban Johnson to Garry Herrmann, May 1, 1911. August “Garry” Herrmann papers, BA MSS 12, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

Letter, Dr. W.O. Forbes to Garry Herrmann, November 25, 1910. August “Garry” Herrmann papers, BA MSS 12, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

Letter, Dr. W.O. Forbes to Garry Herrmann, December 22, 1910. August “Garry” Herrmann papers, BA MSS 12, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

Letter, Dr. W.O. Forbes to Garry Herrmann, January 15, 1911. August “Garry” Herrmann papers, BA MSS 12, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

Letter, Garry Herrmann to Dr. W.O Forbes, December 27, 1910. August “Garry” Herrmann papers, BA MSS 12, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

Letter, George McQuillan to Robert McArdle, February 1910. August “Garry” Herrmann papers, BA MSS 12, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

Letter, J.D. Marquez to Robert McArdle, November 5, 1909. August “Garry” Herrmann papers, BA MSS 12, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

Letter, Robert McArdle to Garry Herrmann, April 18, 1911. August “Garry” Herrmann papers, BA MSS 12, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

Telegram, George McQuillan to Robert McArdle, January 31, 1909. August “Garry” Herrmann papers, BA MSS 12, National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, New York.

United States Census, 1900 and 1910.

MUSIC

Fadeaway’s opening theme is “Under Suspicion” by Lee Rosevere. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

“Can’t Stop (Anotha C-Doc Instrumental)” by Deadly Combo. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

"Life Slow Down (DefMixx for 80Sixx)" by Jahmod Allah. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

“Sorry” by Comfort Fit. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

“The Pipe on the Hob” by Ruellia. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of Soundcloud. 

“Elite Syncopations” written by Scott Joplin and performed by Old Rag-Timer. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of Soundcloud. 

“The Phobia Rag” by Catty Donnelly. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of Soundcloud. 

“Whiskey Before Breakfast” by the Dan River Ramblers. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of Soundcloud. 

“Railroad’s Whiskey Co” by Jahzzar. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of the Free Music Archive. 

“Blue Grass Stomp” by The Joy Drops. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of Soundcloud. 

“Moonshiner” by Reluctant Dragon. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of Soundcloud. 

“The Entertainer” by Scott Joplin. Piano roll, 1902. Public domain recording.

“I Was Drunk” by Alejandro Escovedo. Licensed through Creative Commons, courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

VALEDICTION

Today's closing quote is by Bob Lemon.